A Brief Guide About ISIS

Fighters of  al-Qaeda linked Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant parade at Syrian town of Tel Abyad

 

 

A simple, easy guide to understand the world’s currently ‘richest’, and also most well-organized, terrorist organization (which now operates a nearly fully-functional proto-state). Read the full guide in Urban Times.

NB: It’s just a community post, but don’t worry, it pretty much offers a comprehensive, brief explanation.

 

Excerpt:

 

ISIS Are Billionaires

Speaking of wily tricks and laying claim to sovereign lands, ISIS are not just a band of ragtag nut jobs going gung-ho crazy in the middle of the desert. They are the richest jihadist organization in the world.

Speaking of wily tricks and laying claim to sovereign lands, ISIS are not just a band of ragtag nut jobs going gung-ho crazy in the middle of the desert. They are the richest jihadist organization in the world. The looting of Mosul and other towns in north Iraq gave them ~$1.5 billion in cash and gold bullion. ISIS also have control of a number of Iraqi and Syrian oil fields.

In fact, as they stand, ISIS command a formidable budget of over $2 billion in total. They can buy arms, train armies, hire accomplices, infiltrate organizations and exercise both intelligence and counter-intelligence operations.

To put things in perspective, Al-qaeda’s budget is reported to have been a measly $70-400 million.

 

More bonuses: to gain even more perspectives about this organization, I recommend you to watch VICE News’ direct dispatch of their reporters in covering up the regions ISIS has already controlled. A 5-part documentary, it offers you rare glimpses about life inside this new ‘country’.

 

Rumble in the bank

bank

 

 

February 2013 was an unfortunate moment for one of the world’s largest financial institutions, HSBC.

To know further why, read the full article on Rolling Stone, released exactly during the hype about the banking giant’s alleged misdeeds.

And here are some of the excerpts, provided as always:

For at least half a decade, the storied British colonial banking power helped to wash hundreds of millions of dollars for drug mobs, including Mexico’s Sinaloa drug cartel, suspected in tens of thousands of murders just in the past 10 years – people so totally evil, jokes former New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer, that “they make the guys on Wall Street look good.” The bank also moved money for organizations linked to Al Qaeda and Hezbollah, and for Russian gangsters; helped countries like Iran, the Sudan and North Korea evade sanctions; and, in between helping murderers and terrorists and rogue states, aided countless common tax cheats in hiding their cash.

“They violated every goddamn law in the book,” says Jack Blum, an attorney and former Senate investigator who headed a major bribery investigation against Lockheed in the 1970s that led to the passage of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. “They took every imaginable form of illegal and illicit business.”

The exploding man

the screaming man

 

 

The whole China was left dumbfounded when a man on a wheelchair set off a bomb to himself in Beijing’s international airport last Saturday (20/7).

This man, identified as Ji Zhongxing, claimed that he was a victim of the country’s ‘ravaging’ political and social injustice. He claimed he was captured by local police in Dongguan city, Guangdong province, for owning an illegal motorcycle taxi, but was then severely beaten until he was left paralyzed.

Furthermore, he said that he had petitioned Beijing for a review of his case, but to no avail. He was forced to cover up the court fees, his parents died afterwards, and he ended up burdened in debts. In the climax that followed, setting up explosives was his Hobson’s choice in voicing out his frustration.

The public media itself – and bloggers alike – were largely divided in analyzing this occurrence. Some believed he was ‘victim of the state illegitimacy’, while others, on the other hand, alleged that he was acting like a lone wolf.

 

And what do you think about this case?

 

Read further on how the netizens opined on this case in Global Voices Online.