Infographic: Ukrainian invasion – the sum of all fears

russian invasion

 

 

Will Russia invade Ukraine over Crimea’s matter? That remains a critical concern in today’s international relations.

First thing Kremlin has to consider though: it is technically, cost-wise, impossible for Moscow to launch a huge military offensive on a country populated by more than 45 million people, but that doesn’t also mean improbable as well. Russia had gotten with similar conflict with Georgia in 2008, but the government would be considerate enough to assume that Ukraine is no Georgia.

Well, there’s something that may inhibit Putin’s plan, at the very least: as much as 60 billion US$ has evaporated from Russian stock indices in a single day. A goddamn single day. He must have had enough inner fear himself.

But one analyst, in a counter-argument, and with his similarly risky data analysis, dares himself to invest in Moscow’s stock market. Read the full article in Quartz. Perhaps it’s also the same consideration that comes along Putin’s mind. Think again.

 

Infographics’ source: Business Insider

The Ukrainian tumult

Russian parliament approves use of force in Crimea

 

 

[Putin’s] going to lose on the international stage, Russia is going to lose, the Russian people are going to lose, and he’s going to lose all of the glow that came out of the Olympics, his $60 billion extravaganza. – US Secretary of State, John Kerry, during an interview in NBC’s “Meet The Press”, in response to Putin-led Russia’s decision to dispatch several thousand troops to the tumultuous Crimea, a pro-Russian autonomous region in Ukraine, now already shaken by internal split between those who support integration with European Union, and those who advocate closer relationship with Moscow.

Read a complete summary of the 2014 Crimean crisis on The Guardian.

 

 

Bonus: here is another longform article, titled ‘Fascism, Russia, and Ukraine‘, about the country’s ongoing political deadlock on The New York Review of Books. Here is the excerpt as follows:

 

The protesters represent every group of Ukrainian citizens: Russian speakers and Ukrainian speakers (although most Ukrainians are bilingual), people from the cities and the countryside, people from all regions of the country, members of all political parties, the young and the old, Christians, Muslims, and Jews. Every major Christian denomination is represented by believers and most of them by clergy. The Crimean Tatars march in impressive numbers, and Jewish leaders have made a point of supporting the movement. The diversity of the Maidan is impressive: the group that monitors hospitals so that the regime cannot kidnap the wounded is run by young feminists. An important hotline that protesters call when they need help is staffed by LGBT activists.

On January 16, the Ukrainian government, headed by President Yanukovych, tried to put an end to Ukrainian civil society. A series of laws passed hastily and without following normal procedure did away with freedom of speech and assembly, and removed the few remaining checks on executive authority. This was intended to turn Ukraine into a dictatorship and to make all participants in the Maidan, by then probably numbering in the low millions, into criminals. The result was that the protests, until then entirely peaceful, became violent. Yanukovych lost support, even in his political base in the southeast, near the Russian border.

7 things that Putin really loves… (17+)

Aktivistin der Frauengruppe "Femen" demonstriert auf der Hannover Messe vor Putin und Merkel

 

Putin, I don’t put any silicone here! It’s real boobs!

 

Foreign Policy’s Passport blog – which oftentimes bears resemblance with your typical celebrity tabloids – has compiled some of the weird passions that Mother Russia’s most ‘beloved’ president has zeal in (and many, in fact, are proofs of American exceptionalism):

1. He loves Steven Seagal, and wants him to represent Russia’s weaponry industries.

2. He can be as stiff as a statue when dealing with a nude protester people thought could have instead been a PETA poster child.

3. He ‘probably’ gets inspired from Yellow Submarine – and he really boarded it.

4. He plays solo piano and sings Blueberry Hill!! (and Russia Today had even its full coverage).

5. He has a penchant for biker gangs. (and he only wants those in love with Mother Russia.)

6. He has an obsession in Super Bowl rings that he even collected one.

7. He loves puppies. Huge puppies, indeed.

 

Aktivistin der Frauengruppe "Femen" demonstriert auf der Hannover Messe vor Putin und Merkel

 

In an instance, people mistake Putin for being ‘another statue you see in Madame Tussaud museums’.

 

Read the full article in Foreign Policy. Access more of these pictures in Der Spiegel. And watch precisely how Putin sings an American blues.