Standalone mogul

apple daily

 

Profiling Apple Daily, one of Hong Kong’s most sensational and outspokenly anti-Communist news outlets established by Jimmy Lai, founder of fashion giant Giordano, as it undergoes a series of shadowy threats from numerous underground organizations, one alerting concern also currently being faced by numerous independent journalists living in the semi-independent city-state of what they perceive as ‘Beijing’s increasingly tightening grip on the city’s media industry and freedom of expression’.

Read the full article in Foreign Policy.

 

Excerpt:

 

Lai is the most powerful critic of the Chinese Communist Party in Hong Kong, if not the world. Next Media now employs more than 4,000 people, according to company executives, and also owns popular entertainment magazines and web portals. His flagship tabloid, Apple Daily, founded in 1995, introduced Hong Kong to an irreverent mix of salacious Fleet Street-style journalism and political activism. Lai brought large-character tabloid headlines, web-cam “scoops” of celebrities backstage, irrelevant animations of breaking domestic and international news stories, and front-page calls for protests. But his biggest cause is what in Hong Kong is called “universal suffrage” — the right of citizens, not a council, to choose their chief executive.

Whoever wanted to silence Lai and his activism has instead increased public support for his cause and driven traffic to his websites. Just hours after the fourth triad-style attack, on July 1, tens of thousands of peopletook to the streets calling for genuine democratic elections in 2017.According to internal figures shown to Foreign Policy, traffic to the Hong Kong website has surged to about 20 million page views each day, and that’s not including a staggering 10 million daily views of the news and animation videos.

But Lai’s dream of universal suffrage for Hong Kong is looking less and less likely — and the city’s famously open and cacophonous media landscape is under threat. Hong Kong’s independent-minded journalists are complaining that opinion columns are being tampered with, popular columnists sacked, and news self-censored by tremulous editors. This media crackdown reflects a trend of Beijing tightening its control on Hong Kong. “The Chinese Communist Party’s growing subjugation of the Hong Kong executive and its pressure on the Hong Kong media through its ‘Liaison Office’ is increasingly compromising media pluralism there,” Reporters Without Borders said in a February report. Hong Kong has slid to 61 out of 180 countries and territories on the organization’s World Press Freedom Index, down from 18 in 2002.

And the challenges keep coming. This year, as the July 1 anniversary of Hong Kong’s 1997 handover from Britain to Beijing again approaches, the 66-year-old Lai faces a different kind of threat. Now, two Western financial institutions — banks nurtured in the laws and freedoms of the British Empire — appear to be boycotting Lai’s Hong Kong media business in service of Beijing.

Freedom, Fried

taiwan media

 

Another article about Taiwan, this time focusing on the country’s increasingly sensationalist, ridiculous, and no-holds-barred media industry.

Read the full story on Tea Leaf Nation.

 

Excerpt:

 

Andy Hong, a reporter for Taiwanese newspaper Want Daily and a journalist in Taiwan for 20 years, said that Taiwan’s post-martial law media did not originally run “bloody” or “gossipy” news stories, adding that “newspapers were like those published in the early days of China’s Republican era,” after China had toppled two millennia of imperial rule. Instead, Hong said, they thought they had an obligation “to promote cultural literacy.” Hong’s colleague Yongfu Lin, who became a reporter with the China Times in 1985 and is now deputy director of Want Daily’s cross-strait news division, said that in the years after martial law, “news reports were very diverse,” and the public had “fewer misgivings about the media,” partly because journalists were for the first time targeting political figures who were “once considered off-limits.” But Hong claimed things changed around 2003, when Hong Kong-based Apple Daily, a web site and broadsheet with a tabloid flair known for publishing color photos of grisly crime scenes and scantily-clad women, entered Taiwan and “immediately attracted readers.”

David Puttnam: Does the media have a “duty of care”?

media-md

 

 

If it’s not true, don’t say it; if it’s not right, don’t do it. – Marcus Aurelius

Mass media, ideally, is supposed to empower us with fact-based information, ideas, and ability to question everything taking place around our circumstances. Nevertheless, reality itself often displays quite the contrary: media, under the control of a handful of corporations with hidden agenda, oftentimes present to us distorted facts, misinformation, and propaganda for their own sake. In brief, we were led to believe in false misconceptions about the world, the society, and the truth surrounding us. As a consequence, we become highly passive in democratic participation, believe in nothing whatever governments say, and tend to avoid with apathy virtually every issue occurring in our societies.

Still, though, despite the repeated cycles, majority of these media businesses do not cease with the current pattern they adopt. We are bombarded with trivial matters (say infotainment news), while at the same time overlooking bigger, and much more urgent, issues related to us. Some of them, meanwhile, do only serve themselves as mouthpieces for certain individuals aggressively vying for better control of the societies (say, politicians, government, parties, or have-all oligarchs). Some of them, under the sake of partiality and advantage to certain sides, even attempt so far to provoke our minds with distorted, half-baked news, only to exploit our emotional responses to these reports for their own benefits. This, for sure, damages the basic nature of democracy itself.

In this TED talk, as conducted by TEDxHousesofParliament, David Puttnam, an award-winning filmmaker and now a public policy analyst, offers to us his harsh criticisms towards the integrity of our media industry in contemporary times. Despite the rigidity of his advice, it is hoped that his talk improves our understanding about the current state of mass media today.