The boom and bust of monster porn literature

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As conventional publishing industry is regarded gradually obsolescent, a great deal of authors have resorted to self-publishing measures, particularly e-books, now in a rate so unprecedented since its initial negative outlook that, given the very little interest readers put in, it would be fated to doom. With the availability of Internet, smartphones, or even computer tablets, the exponential growth of this industry is obviously inevitable.

Hypnotized with its prospects of bringing authors mounts of cash pretty fast, though, it generates a setback for the industry itself: it is critically lackadaisical of quality control. Oftentimes with no reliable editors to examine the drafts back, it can spawn countless low-grade works online, with poor plots, grammatical errors, and improper use of language.

Monster erotica, or widely known as monster porn – that literary prose where young girls, mostly sexy and, expletive to say, bitchy, engage in various abnormal sexual positions with mythological creatures, oftentimes ugly –  is one of the by-products.

Read the full article on Business Insider to know more what the hype this brand-new genre is all about.

 

Excerpt:

 

In October, the online news site The Kernel published an incendiary story called “An Epidemic of Filth,” claiming that online bookstores like Amazon, Barnes & Noble, WHSmith, and others were selling self-published ebooks that featured “rape fantasies, incest porn and graphic descriptions of bestiality and child abuse.” The story ignited a media firestorm in the U.K, with major news outlets like the Daily Mail, The Guardian, and the BBC reporting on the “sales of sick ebooks.” Some U.K.-based ebook retailers responded with public apologies, and WHSmith went so far as to shut down its website altogether, releasing a statement saying that it would reopen “once all self-published eBooks have been removed and we are totally sure that there are no offending titles available.” The response in the U.S. was somewhat more muted, but most of the retailers mentioned in the piece, including Amazon and Barnes & Noble, began quietly pulling hundreds of titles from their online shelves — an event Kobo COO Michael Tamblyn referred to last month as “erotica-gate.” 

The crackdown was meant to target the obvious offenders — ebooks like “Daddy’s Birthday Gang Bang” and others that fetishized incest and rape — but in their fervor to course-correct, the online bookstores started deleting, according to The Digital Reader blog, “not just the questionable erotica but [also]…. any e-books that might even hint at violating cultural norms.” That included crypto-porn. Wade’s sexy Sasquatch, not unlike the elusive hominid beast of legend, vanished without a trace.

 

What it takes to be a true author

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A worthwhile piece of advice from John Updike for aspiring writers:

Try to develop actual work habits and, even though you have a busy life, try to reserve an hour, say, or more a day to write. Very good things have been written on an hour a day. . . . So take it seriously, set a quota, try to think of communicating with some ideal reader somewhere. . . .

Don’t be contentious to call yourself a writer and then bitch about the crass publishing world that won’t run your stuff. We’re still a capitalist country and writing, as some would agree, is a capitalist enterprise… It’s not a total sin to try to make a living and court an audience.

Read what excites you… and even if you don’t imitate it, you will learn from it. . . .

Don’t try to get rich. . . . If you want to get rich, you should go into investment banking or be a certain kind of lawyer. On the other hand, I like to think that in a country this large and a language even larger, that there ought to be a living for somebody who cares and wants to entertain and instruct a reader. 

 

You can watch his interview videos by Academy of Achievement in Brain Pickings.