Africans in Guangzhou – ‘Chocolate City’

africans in guangzhou

 

Migration has been a continuous trait in human journeys across the world, one continent and beyond. Globalization, in fact, makes it even more intensive, and more complicating than ever; as many as 250 million people over the planet – that’s a quarter billion – are now living outside their home countries, and it is rapidly increasing higher than ever.

Global migration changes the demographic faces of countries, cities, and societies; they also transform how people perceive of social and cultural fabric within their neighborhood, forcing them to rethink about ‘durability’. As changes are always constant and imminent, people, like it or not, must be prepared for changes.

Guangzhou, one of China’s largest cities, is one example. Populated by over 10 million people, this city, once nearly homogenously Chinese, has seen a drastic influx of African migrants, all of whom are in search of better life. Between 20,000 and 200,000 Africans, scattered across dozens of countries over the continent, are now calling this metropolis ‘their second home’. They don’t simply set up businesses, earn money, and leave it; they are meant to inhabit it. Some marry local women, and now, a whole new generation of ‘Afro-Chinese’ children are now growing up in Guangzhou. It’s something no one had imagined three decades earlier, when everyone was busy about market reforms.

 

View the whole slides in Al Jazeera to understand better about this brand-new community.

Infographics: mapping Syria’s rebellion

Syria's rebellion

Originally intended to maintain peaceful purposes, the protests occurring all along Syria in early 2011, beyond everybody’s expectation, turned into a continuous wave of civil war which has been lasting for more than two and a half years, and is still ongoing.

Estimation of the casualties is possibly up to 100,000; millions more have been, either internally or externally, displaced, and the exodus it results has also caused further chaos in neighboring countries like Lebanon and Turkey. To worsen the situation, there has also been disintegration in the rebel forces themselves. Exacerbated by Obama’s dangerous plan to include military intervention after reports of use in chemical weapons surfaced in global media, which case was only resolved after further negotiation with Russia’s Putin administration, the fate of this once stable country is nowhere in sight.

Al Jazeera has a complete report, compiled in infographic, about the complicating structures of the rebels who, despite overlapping hidden agenda, do share one similitude: they are all vying for the overthrow of Bashar al-Assad’s regime.