China’s next target in the South China Sea


south china sea

 

As China’s geopolitical stance becomes increasingly assertive, the soon-to-be superpower is now emboldening its claim in several places ‘historically assumed’ to be belonging to them. One major point of contention among them is the dispute in South China Sea. As it is disputed by China, Taiwan, Vietnam, Philippines, Malaysia, and Brunei, and numerous diplomatic talks have repeatedly stalled, this issue is becoming more complicating than ever.

Right now, with the latest nine-dash map released by Chinese government, there’s one country that is increasingly possibly involved in this dispute as well. And that’s Indonesia.

Victor Robert Lee, a geopolitical expert and also a novelist, analyzes this in Medium. Read the full article by clicking the link.

 

Excerpt:

 

The Natuna archipelago has been the subject of an Indonesia-China tug-of-war before. Until the 1970s the majority of Natuna residents were ethnic Chinese. Deadly anti-Chinese riots plagued Indonesia in the 1960s, early 1980s, and again in 1998, leading to a decline of the ethnic Chinese population on Natuna from an estimated 5,000–6,000 to somewhere over 1,000 currently. Many ethnic Chinese in the broader region believe to this day that a secret meeting (never publicly confirmed) was held between Deng Xiaoping (China’s premier from 1978 to 1992) and Natuna islanders of Chinese origin who asked that Deng either back their bid for independence from Indonesia, or bring their island under Chinese suzerainty.

Neither happened, and as part of a nation-wide transmigration initiative, the Indonesian government in the 1980s started to relocate ethnically Malay Indonesians to Natuna, for the stated reasons of importing skills and relieving population pressures on the over-crowded main island of Java, and, as perceived by local Chinese Indonesians, for the unstated reason of swamping the ethnic Chinese population with “real Indonesians.” That is, people of Malay ethnicity, who now number approximately 80,000 in the Natuna Islands group.

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