Movie title: The War in the Mind

the war in the mind

 

The man had been, for the whole of his life, an idealist. A dream-fighter, but also a rather conforming, obedient one. Raised in a conservative family, he had been taught that achieving Ivy League was an enormity, and therefore he had to strike hard for it.

Then came the Vietnam War. His friends had been draft dodgers and followed the life paths of hippies, but conforming to his parents’ wishes – the father of whom had been a World War II veteran before – he realized enlisting himself was a Hobson’s choice. And he thought being sent to Vietnam could raise glory for himself, save ‘those little people living in wild jungles’, and for the nation.

Reality proved him disastrously wrong. Both American and Vietnamese troops committed similar amounts of savagery against each other, maiming and killing not only themselves, but also innocent civilians. He witnessed some of his fellow soldiers persecute war prisoners and exploit the civilians; while some of them kindheartedly assisted the Vietnamese throughout the ordeal, he also saw Communist troops murdering them in vengeance. The retaliation never ceased, while his commanders prevailed giving him orders to ‘kill, kill, and kill’. He questioned his motives of life, the meaning, its existence, and everything about it. And he will soon go insane.

 

(is that so Platoon-ishly mainstream like any other Vietnam War films? Prove me right.)

Movie title: La Voglia

la voglia

 

Shortly after World War II, a medical doctor, having lost his wife, found himself falling in love with an orphan. That ‘friendship’, slowly, became a romantic – and, outspokenly, sexual – relationship. But, mysteriously, a few years afterwards, the girl disappeared. The doctor was desperate to look for her existence, and he poured out his emotion in his secret diary, oftentimes with his own imaginary scenarios.

What do you think then?

 

NB: ‘voglia’ is actually Italian word for ‘craving’, or ‘desire’.