Movie title: The Rescue

the rescue

 

 

Or make it like this: he used to be a millionaire, but ended up poor for his addiction to gambling and drugs throughout the Great Depression. Somehow, unexpectedly, after NAZI rose to power, and persecution of German Jews began, he became a hero, though after the World War II, he met his own tragic ending. You could decide how his life would end, whether he was deported to Siberia or to arid desert in Central Asia. You choose.

Movie title: The Texas Singers’ Club

the texas singers club

 

 

It’s actually kind of like ‘Inside Llewyn Davis’, but this time with more gospel, and possibly, a happier ending though.

Denis Dutton: A Darwinian theory of beauty

beauty

 

Source: illustrationsof.com

 

Beauty, as a notion, has always been an inseparable trait of human nature. Throughout history, the concept of beauty has long been embodied in countless works of art, either in prehistoric drawings over the caves, sculptures, paintings, literary pieces, and numerous others to mention. Its meaning, its profound effect it gives to our perception of the world, and its importance are so encompassing that without such realization, our world would not have been a colorful one we see today.

It turns out that the history of aesthetics, and its spread, is not as simple as we can imagine. Numerous research by scientists, anthropologists, archaeologists, and professionals of other disciplinary fields alike have shown that this idea has long been rooted in the process of evolution, far before even human beings started to learn speaking. And, to add more surprises, the concept of beauty is universalized in numerous other animal species, say, peacocks, which show their ornamented, kinky-colored feathers to attract their opposite sexes.

The question is: what drives creatures to convey up a concept of beauty? Where does it really originate from? Why did it become an everlasting feature of human nature, and to a broader extent, of nearly all creatures? And how could it correlate with natural selection? Denis Dutton, a philosophy professor, will explain further in the TED talk below. Watch it, and think.