Briefly explained. Our third outreach.


Panti Asuhan Kasih Indonesia

 

One of my friends (also a mentor and secretary in SEALNet Medan Chapter @ SMA Sutomo 1 Medan), Adriana Salim, posted a video in Youtube about our outreach to Panti Asuhan Kasih Indonesia we visited on 15th April, Sunday. As you could see in the video, there was laughter, there was fun, there was motivation, there was singing, there was a brief noetic strike, and there was everything. Some of the parts included me teaching English (that would be present tense), and some others included self-contemplation speech, prepared extemporaneously, by our dearest CCA’s coach, one of our school’s most beloved and stand-up-comedian-alike teachers, Supian Sembiring. You could see the children laughing, gamboling frantically, complete with their innocent, angelic expressions.

But, personally, as I had to confess, all the exhilaration that you saw was merely, with no intention to show that I am a pessimist, tip of an iceberg. In addition, I even wanted to say that what our seniors had done (kudos to Edric Subur, Winnie Illona, and the rest of our mentors) was myriad times much better than what we had made. Perhaps this might sound humiliating, but all I could conclude from this third outreach was a bit ‘epic-fail’ episode.

 

 

Straightforwardly, perhaps I had to explain why I could dub it so. This began from our consensus, of all of us, that we would teach them basic English skills, given that their English scores are deteriorating as time passes (that’s what we heard from the founder of the orphanage, whom we refer to as bapak panti). Afterwards, having been procrastinated more than 2 times from February to April due to rescheduling of school exam, the children having vacation in Berastagi to celebrate the birthday of their largest contributor, and fear of fuel-price hike protests, we managed to conduct it, complete with all the materials to be taught, including past, present, and future tenses. I myself had even prepared grammar exercises for the teenagers, while another mentor of SEALNet, Elvira, also had had a large poster containing pictures of fruits with both English and Indonesian names.

 

Adriana (left) and Elvira (right)

 

In full contradiction, our assumption was totally wrong. It is true that the bapak panti, known as Mr.Zebua, owns 2 orphanages, one of which was our destination on that outreach. Around 47 individuals, mostly primary-class students, are registered in the database of the orphanage we visited. When we reached there, it turned out to be almost exactly 102. Everything we had set and had planned very well was originally intended only to fit 47 persons, but this became our Achilles’ heel when we found out the name tags were already empty (we wrote down all the 102 children’s names in the name tags, with aim to keep the rest – those who stay in the other orphanage – assume we visited theirs).

At the same time, I only printed grammar exercise suited for 20 teenagers, while in fact, it turned out that more than 30 others were also present on the time we visited it.

I taught present tense in front of all the individuals. Deep inside my heart, I conjectured that instead of educating human beings, I was more like bragging in front of statues. Most of the individuals had no comprehension what I was talking about (and so did the mentors and the mentees). Some said that I was more of a ‘don’t-ask-don’t-tell’ type of mentor, leaving them in much confusion – and certainly – tedium. Only few were willing to listen, mostly the girls. The primary-class students stared at me with blank expression. Mr.Supian later told me that these kids had even never been taught pronounciation of English words in their school. Some teenagers had, in fact, been taught such tenses many times in their school. What I could conclude from this statement: okay, I’m a dinosaur.

 

Pak Supian is a superb educator.

 

Our outreach succeeded largely thanks to Mr.Supian’s assistance. Without prior preparation, he spoke so well that he reminded me of the way a priest talks in front of the congregation. That quite helped in spurring their gusto. He led the prayer, the cantillation, and the carol-singing session. I couldn’t help but wonder, while I recorded his talk: how many thousands of outreach sessions had he ever undergone in his life? Mine is perhaps simply one-thousandth of his.

Somehow, it was better to have a ‘half-baked’ outreach, whose execution in reverse bore no resemblance with the timeline we had set altogether, than to have null-and-void at all. In the end, we sang songs altogether (mostly Christian-themed songs with we-know-what lyrics), and we handed out some drawing books, notebooks, unused books, Kuark science magazines, school textbooks, dictionaries, encyclopedias, snacks, drinks, and a long list to go.

 

 

I thanked everyone (especially those tagged in the note) who had paid total concentration on their efforts to make the outreach succeed. Particularly to Adriana. She has had multitudinous talents that I hardly possess. She’s magnificent in drawing out the posters, she’s superb in photography, and she’s able to make and edit videos as well. But my deepest kudo goes to Mr.Supian. Given the fact that we are not that financially able to hire such salient motivators like Andrie Wongso or Mario Teguh, he’s been very enough for us to provide satisfaction to these buddies.

By the way, on 29th April, we are still having another outreach session to go. Expect ‘the motivator’ to come back. Be very curious.

 

Both these posters are nicely designed by Adriana (except the future tense, thanks to the help from my classmate, Jesslyn Calosa). Thanks a lot!

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